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John Taffer, host of SpikeTV’s popular Bar Rescue show,...

Sun, 24 Mar 2013



John Taffer, host of SpikeTV’s popular Bar Rescue show, thanks me  and DraftMore for supporting the show in Seasons 3 & 4.  DraftMore will be featured on multiple episodes of Bar Rescue starting Mar 24.  Saving bars by saving money on draft beer!

Draftmore will be featured on Bar Rescue this Sunday (Spike TV, 10 pm EST) Check it out!

Fri, 22 Mar 2013

Draftmore will be featured on Bar Rescue this Sunday (Spike TV, 10 pm EST) Check it out!

Nine Beers Americans Are Drinking Less Of

Tue, 11 Dec 2012

Interesting article on Yahoo! Finance (properly attributed, with the ‘!’ and everything).  Go here (Nine Beers Americans Don’t Drink) and read it if you grew up drinking beer in America, especially in the 80s and 90s.  If you don’t like to read, the answer is Michelob.

Oh, Michelob, I fondly remember your cone shaped bottles, your pretending to be that lonely, misunderstood beer in the cooler which wanted two more dollars from me for six beers that I could not tell were not Budweiser.  Why didn’t Anheuser Busch ever give you a super cool mascot like ‘Spuds Mackenzie’?  Why weren’t you the life of every hot tub party and spontaneous gathering?  Because you thought you were too good for that - apparently not.  Even Michelob Amber can’t save you now.

I indavertently created a prepositional phrase for the title because it’s not that Americans aren’t drinking these beers, they just drink them much, much less often.  Either I’m a genius for making you say ‘Hey! Prepositional Phrase!’, and then being oddly fascinated, or I’m lazy because I couldn’t be bothered to reconstruct the phrase.  I’ll let you decide.  As always, comments are off.

A trove of medals for American brewers at European Beer Star competition

Wed, 05 Dec 2012

Nice article at Cork, Caps and Taps on the results of the beer tasting contest held in Nuremburg, Germany this year.  The contest had 50 beer categories, all original European styles, with American brewers earning 37 medals in 22 categories - what a great showing!  A couple of our favorites, Brewery Ommegang, Firestone Walker and Sam Adams came away winners.  Check out the article, subscribe to Cork, Caps and Taps and support your local brewer!

DraftMore at Brau Breviale Festival Nov 13 - 15

Sat, 27 Oct 2012

Is anyone planning to attend the Brau Breviale Festival in Nuremburg, Nov 13 - 15?  If so, please drop by and see Jesper and Niels at the DraftMore booth, Hall 9 Booth 316. For more info, please visit the show website at http://www.brau-beviale.de/en/.

New Draught Quality Website from BA!

Wed, 29 Aug 2012

New Draught Quality Website from BA!:

Just announced today - www.draughtquality.org, a whole new website from the Brewer’s Association dedicated to serving draft beer properly, including good information on draft system basics.  There is no mention (yet) of DraftMore, but we’ll contact the committee and see if they will include a mention of our regulator, as there is nothing like it on the market!  Bookmark and share this website - the more people are informed about draft beer, the better off we all are.  Cheers!

Cash in on Draft Beer - via Bar & Nightclub Exec Briefing

Tue, 10 Jul 2012

Here’s a link to a new email newsletter we’re happy to be associated with: July 5th issue.

In that issue, (next to the DraftMore ad placed by ABSOne), there is a link to a good article on draft beer: Tap Into The Trend. Check it out!

Check out this ad for DraftMore! Thanks ABSOne!

Tue, 10 Jul 2012

ABSOne, a stocking distributor of DraftMore Automatic Regulators, bought some ad space in the fairly new Bar & Nightclub Executive Briefing email newsletter. The newsletter goes to 13,000 bars and restaurants. The first ad to go featured DraftMore - about halfway down, in the July 5th issue: Bar & Nightclub Exec Briefing.

Thanks Jeff and ABSOne!  Looking forward to growing our sales together!

Another Way to Wear Your Guinness

Tue, 12 Jun 2012

Most of us have maybe had a time or two where we ended up wearing what we had been drinking.  Now you can have this experience 24/7 - and it’s even sexy! An Australian company is designing clothes from microbes which grow on organic liquids such as red wine and Guinness.  The clothes are form fitting, and look and smell like the liquid.  Full article: Wear Your Guinness.

Pictured below is ‘Red Wine’.

Wearing Red Wine

Draft Beer from an iPad - Watch This!

Tue, 12 Jun 2012

Wow, we all know iPads are cool, but I did not know you could get beer out of them! Check out the link to this YouTube video, filmed at the famed Hofbrau Haus in Munich.  I may have to hire this guy for my next tradeshow! Enjoy!

Draft Beer from iPad - Video

Guinness Bubbles Mystery Solved!

Thu, 07 Jun 2012

We love science! Especially when it tells us things that leave us speechless, and thirsty. Why do the bubbles in Guinness seem to go down, rather than up? Can a pint (or several) of Guinness actually alter reality?  Read on, dear reader!!

I may be slow to the party, but I recently discovered ‘Drinking Made Easy’ by Zane Lamprey, a funny guy who brings a great sense of humor to, um, consumption. He blogged about a Huffington Post article on the science behind this mystery. Here’s the link to Zane’s post: Drinking Made Easy - Guinness Bubbles

New Install - Willie's Bar in Salt Lake City

Wed, 23 May 2012

I haven’t been out to do an install in a while, I have mostly been trying to get things going in other markets. But we shouldn’t ignore out local bars which have foaming problems.  Geremy at Willie’s called to say of his nine draft beers, he had 3 beers (all from the big brewers) he had foaming problems with.  We put in 3 DraftMore units in about 30 minutes, and all the beers are pouring great. Thanks Geremy!

Win GABF Tickets During Craft Beer Week!

Mon, 14 May 2012

Following up on my last post, you are now primed to start thinking about the Great American Beer Festival.  Go to this page (Win Tickets) on the official site of Craft Beer Week (www.craftbeer.com).

It's American Craft Beer Week!

Mon, 14 May 2012

This reminds me somewhat of those German holidays that are celebrated in the name of some long forgotten saint, but really are just a convenient reason to have a few great beers.

In America, we don’t have a tradition of naming holidays after saints (other than St. Patty’s, of course), we just tell you what is happening.  IT’S CRAFT BEER WEEK! HAVE A FEW BEERS!

Not like you needed it, but here are 5 great reasons to have a (few) craft beer(s) today:

1) Support the American workforce.  Damn straight, with local, fresh beer! The highest and best way to support this cause is to visit your local bar, supporting your bartender, bar back, bar owner, beer distributor, brewer, etc., etc. - look at you! An American hero.  Just trying to give a little back.

2) Try something new.  These days, you have so many wonderful choices in quality craft brew, you owe it to yourself to try something you haven’t had before.  Celebrate Choice!

3) Have a real party. By, you know, inviting people over to socialize and enjoy a craft brew with you. Nothing feels better than sharing good times.

4) Confirm you have good taste. The craft beer movement is thriving - because you can taste the difference.

5) Because you deserve it.  Treat you better, won’t you?

2012 World Beer Cup Winners Announced

Mon, 07 May 2012

The 2012 Craft Brewer’s Conference in San Diego just wrapped up, and the winners have been announced.

The Champion Brewery and Brewer Awards winners are:

Small Brewing Company Category
Brauerei Michael Plank, Michael Plank

Mid-Size Brewing Company Category
Firestone Walker Brewing Company, Matthew Brynildson

Large Brewing Company Category
AB InBev, Claudio Ferro

Small Brewpub Category
Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant-Media, Iron Hill Brewery Team

Large Brewpub Category
Pelican Pub & Brewery, Darron R S Welch

The full list of winners can be found here.  Of note: Our friends at Squatters earned a Gold and a Bronze. The Intermountain West was well represented, with winners from Montana, Utah, Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. Good job, everyone - see you next year!!

Where Have You Been?

Fri, 04 May 2012

Whoops, it’s May already! Kinda missed most of March and April.

We’ve had a lot happen since our last post:

  • We exhibited at the IBDEA product fair - what a great time, we met lots of nice people and made good connections. We look forward to being a part of this group for a long time.  If your business is in the Beverage Dispensing Equipment industry, you need to join - see IBDEA.org.
  • We went to the Bar and Nightclub show, and met more great people.  The folks from Heineken were showing their new Heineken on Draft setup.  Amazing, they use a glycol cooler from Banner which cools 70 degree beer down to ice-cold temps!
  • We met Amy, the principal of our new rep firm, s3 Hospitality. s3 will represent DraftMore in the intermountain region. We’re currently running a promo with them - a brand new Wii gaming system for the first agent to sell 30 DraftMores!
  • We have two new stocking distributors, 44 Deg N in Toronto and ABSOne in Chicagoland.  Welcome!
  • We introduced some new sales materials, and continue to add to our marketing support material.
  • We sent out our first email newsletter - we won’t do it to often, we don’t want to bug you, just inform you as things progress.  If you want to be on the mailing list, please subscribe.

Thanks, James

DraftMore N America Headed to Bar & Nightclub Show

Fri, 09 Mar 2012

So, we’re headed to Vegas today to meet up with our fellow IBDEA members.  We’ll send regular updates, we’re hoping to pick up a few more distributors and/or reps at the meeting.  Then it’s on to the Bar and Nightclub show, which sounds like a really good time, but I’ll let you know for sure!  To all who will be there - get in touch, let’s meet up!

We will be a little less available for the next few days due to meetings, etc.  But leave a message and we’ll get back to you.

Tweet - A - Beer - Nice Way to Treat Your Friends!

Fri, 09 Mar 2012

A new app is rolling out at the South by Southwest festival.  Called #Tweet-A-Beer, it lets you send beer money to your friends by tying your Paypal and Twitter accounts together using Chirpify - to be used for a beer, of course.  I promise, if you tweet-a-beer to me, I’ll buy one!!

Full article is here.

Skiing with Charley Kleinrichert AC Beverage

Wed, 07 Mar 2012

So I received a pleasant surprise telephone call from Charley Kleinrichert last week, letting me know he would be in Park City (our hometown) this week for skiing. He said I had talked it up pretty good last time we visited.

Charley got in Monday night and managed to get some night skiing in at Park City Resort for his warm up. Yesterday, I met him for a half day at Deer Valley, the #1 ranked resort in the U.S.  Charley is a good skier who likes to go fast, so we spent all afternoon ripping down the slopes (with the occasional break to enjoy a Utah craft beer). We had a great time and really enjoyed catching up.

We’re both headed to the IBDEA meeting in Las Vegas later this week, then the Bar and Nightclub show.  If you’re going I’ll see you there!

Local Park City distillery High West is a semi-finalist for 2012 James Beard Awards!

Mon, 05 Mar 2012

Utah’s only distillery, High West, is in the running for ‘Outstanding Bar Program’.  This new category for 2012 recognizes a restaurant or bar for excellence in cocktail, spirits and/or beer service.  The complete list of semi-finalists can be found at www.jamesbeard.org/awards.

If you don’t know about High West, you should go to your nearest liquor store and find one of their rye whiskey blends.  Both the 16 and 21 year olds are sublime, but even the 10 year has an excellent, full flavor with a mellow bite.  Clearly something to enjoy.  They also offer a uniquely thicker vodka made from oats.  To find a retailer near you, check www.highwest.com.

If you’re ever in Park City, just ski down and have yourself a glass or two of one of the finest whiskeys made in the U.S.  I’m pretty sure High West is the only ski in/ski out distillery in the U.S.

Faq Warranty

Please browse our Frequently Asked Questions. If you don't find the answer please contact us.
Click on a question to read the complete answer.

The DraftMore®

Automatic Regulator Performance Guarantee

DraftMore Automatic Regulators will help you make more money and help you serve better draft beer - GUARANTEED. If your system is set up correctly, and you aren’t satisfied that your beer pours better, contact us within 30 days of receipt to return your DraftMore Automatic Regulator for a full refund.

The DraftMore®

Automatic Regulator Warranty

All DraftMore Automatic Regulators are warranted free of manufacturing defects for three years from the date of purchase. If a DraftMore regulator ever fails due to a defect within three years of purchase, we’ll replace it – free of charge.

DraftMore Automatic Regulators are precisely assembled in Denmark. The DraftMore Automatic Regulator is constructed entirely of metal, including the diaphragm, valve system and valve body.
The components are permanently sealed to form a single unit, without the use of rubber seals or gaskets. DraftMore Automatic Regulators are built tough, and are designed for use in a commercial environment. An investment in a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is one that will pay for itself many, many times over.

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Which DraftMore Automatic Regulator Is Best For My System?


Please see our Selection Guide .



How Do I Install A DraftMore Automatic Regulator?


Please refer to our Installation and Use page or download our Easy Installation Guide.



How Is A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Superior To A Standard Regulator?


The main advantage is that the DraftMore Automatic Regulator self adjusts to always provide the correct pressure. It is designed to automatically adjust the pressure to correct for temperature and for small differences in carbonation level. The DraftMore regulator is not affected by altitude because it is a sealed system. You cannot get your pressure wrong using a DraftMore regulator – that means better beer and more profit on draft beer. Never adjust a regulator again!

Most technicians who work for the beer distributors carry expensive test gauges to test system pressure. Their single biggest reason? “We don’t trust secondary regulators”. With a DraftMore regulator, you don’t need to worry - the pressure is correct every time. We have swapped DraftMore regulators into well set up systems in place of high quality beer regulators, and seen an immediate improvement in the quality of beer served and reduced foam and waste.

A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is highly accurate (+/- 0.5 psi) so that it always provides the correct pressure. Most standard regulators, even ones made with premium parts, are less accurate. We regularly measure secondary regulators that are off by 2 psi or more. Many cheap standard secondary regulator have a wider deadband by design, by the use of inferior parts, and by looser manufacturing tolerances, but the inexpensive gauges attached to most beer regulators are also a source of error. As a comparison, CO2 regulators of the same design which are used for aquariums routinely cost $250 - $400 each – they use better parts, tighter tolerances and better gauges, and use a needle valve system (DraftMore uses a proprietary needle valve) to increase accuracy.

DraftMore regulators are an all-metal design, with no seals to wear out. They come with a 3 year warranty and a performance guarantee. And, they self adjust to correct for temperature and for minor variations in carbonation level (common with smaller brewery beers).



Do I Need To Make Any Changes To My System To Use A DraftMore Automatic Regulator?


Your system needs to be properly balanced. Once you install a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, you cannot turn the pressure up or down to change the beer flow (and you shouldn’t). This is best, because your beer will always be correctly carbonated. You will need to ensure you have the proper amount of restriction in your system, adjusted correctly for your altitude. For more on restriction and altitude, please see the topic How Does Elevation Affect Regulator Settings and Beer Flow?.

You should also ensure your system is at the correct temperature, ideally between 36 – 38 degrees. This is best for the beer, although DraftMore will always give the correct pressure between 30 and 90 degrees F. If you store your beer warmer than about 40 degrees F, you will affect the beer flow (because DraftMore will apply more pressure in response to warmer temps), and it may exceed the system’s design, causing CO2 breakout and foaming. You will also noticeably shorten the life of your beer – from weeks to days. If you prefer warmer beer, we suggest storing your beer at 40 degrees F and rinsing your glass with warm water prior to pouring. Use a longer restriction hose to help slow down your beer – warm, fast beer is mostly foam.

Other issues which can cause foaming include dirty beer lines, dirty glassware (even clean glass ware needs to be ‘beer clean’), improper technique, frozen glassware, warm glassware, and temperature differentials in the beer system (generally, a difference over 2 degrees F between the bottom of the keg and the faucet).



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Help With Wild or Foamy Beer?


Improper pressure and/or temperature instability are two of the biggest issues which contribute to foaming. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator ensures the pressure is always correct for the beer type at any given temperature. Simply ensure the DraftMore regulator you are using is matched to the beer type (see our Selection Guide).



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Help Increase Draft Beer Profits?


It is a happy coincidence that the best way to get the most beer out of a keg is when it is perfectly carbonated. If a beer is not served under enough pressure, it will foam at the beginning of the keg, then pour flat for the last half of the keg. If a keg is under too much pressure, it will foam for the last half of the keg, and you will leave several beers in the keg that cannot be poured because they are all foam. A keg with the correct pressure will pour with a perfect head all the way through – you will not even know you are running out of beer by the way it pours. See our Savings Calculator for an idea of the difference perfect pressure can make in keg yield and profit.



How Quickly Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Pay For Itself?


Improvements in keg yield are figured at a cost basis - you increase your ‘beers per keg’. It really depends on the cost of your beer, but for most of our customers, a DraftMore Automatic Regulator pays for itself in about 2 months. If your beer costs more than $90 per keg, the payback period is quicker. If you sell more than 2 kegs per week per tap, your payback is quicker.

The reason is simple – our moneyback guarantee that you will ‘Pour More, Better Beer’ with a DraftMore Automatic Regulator. Typically, our customers pour at least 15 more beers per keg with a DraftMore regulator installed. Use our Savings Calculator to estimate your payback period and additional profits. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is a one-time investment that pays for itself many, many times over.



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Require Any Maintenance?


No. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is sealed, and cannot be adjusted or maintained. Be sure that other parts of your system are properly maintained, and examine the check valve occasionally to ensure cleaning chemicals do not get past the check valve and enter the DraftMore.



Can A DraftMore Regulator Help If The Beer And Food Are In The Same Walk-In Cooler?


Yes, a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is the perfect solution for this situation. When staff enter the cooler frequently, or leave the door open during deliveries, the temperature in the cooler and the temperature of the beer increase. This increase in temperature demands an increase in pressure in order to keep the CO2 balanced and prevent foaming. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator greatly reduces the amount of beer waste and foaming, and quickly pays for itself in these situations. See our list of Satisfied Customers – many are restaurants who are solving this problem with DraftMore Automatic Regulators! A keg takes four times as long to cool down as to warm up – so if the cooler is left open for 15 minutes, it will take an hour for the beer to cool back down. Without a DraftMore regulator, this cycle greatly decreases your keg yield.



Will A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work In a Kegerator System?


Yes, DraftMore regulators work very well in kegerator systems. Even though temperature fluctuation is not much of a problem in a kegerator (outside of improperly cooled towers), the high accuracy of a DraftMore regulator is the single best way to improve beer quality and keg yield. We have kegerator customers who have gone to almost zero beer waste – even when switching over kegs. See our Satisfied Customers.

DraftMore’s ability to adjust to automatically adjust the pressure even helps reduce or eliminate foaming when installing a new keg that has not been stored in the kegerator. Please see our Kegerator Setup Tips for more information.



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With Mixed Gas (Beer Gas)?


Yes, we have models that work with 60% CO2 Systems, 70% CO2 systems and 25% CO2 systems (for Guinness and other nitrogenated beers with a similar carbonation level). Please see our Selection Guide. You may also want to see the topic ‘How Can A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Improve A Mixed Gas System?’ and ‘What Is Important to Know About Mixed Gas Systems?’



Will A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With A Beer Pump System?


Yes, we have several accounts which use DraftMore Automatic Regulators with beer pumps. The setup to the pump in the cooler for a beer pump system is fundamentally the same as a direct draw system, so you would select a DraftMore unit suitable for 100% CO2 systems. Please see our Selection Guide.



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With Guinness®?


Yes, we have we have a model which works great with Guinness and similar beers. Please see our Selection Guide.



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Help Me ‘Pour More, Better Beer’?


A DraftMore regulator is the single best way to ensure beer is served as the brewery designed it. By ensuring that the carbonation level is always accurate, the beer is served with the correct level of carbonation and will pour with the right head. All beers should have a head when poured and presented. The amount of head will differ based on the beer type, but typically for an American lager it’s ¾-1 inch in a 16 ounce glass.

When the beer is served with the correct head, you maximize the keg yield, meaning you get more beer out of a keg. Head is typically about 25% beer. So a 16 ounce glass with a 1 inch head contains a total of about 12.25 ounces of beer, correctly served. A 16 ounce glass with a ½ head contains about 14.1 ounces of beer – almost 2 more ounces per beer served. Plus, the beer is more flat and less appealing. See the topic ‘How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Increase Keg Yield?’.



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Help With Flat Beer?


A DraftMore AutoMatic Regulator ensures the carbonation level is always correct. This means your beer is never too flat or too foamy, but is served as the brewer intended. Flat beer is not as flavorful or aromatic, and does not have the taste the brewer intended.



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Help Serve Better Beer?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator ensures the correct carbonation and head for every pour so that your beer has the taste and aroma the brewer intended. With a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, you can ‘Pour More, Better Beer’ – guaranteed.



When a keg is always under the correct pressure, as when DraftMore is controlling the CO2 pressure, the beer is served with the proper head, and all of the beer can be served from the keg. The head on a beer is not only critical to the presentation and enhancing the taste and aroma of the beer, but also maximizes keg yield. This ensures that the beer in the bottom of the keg does not turn to overcarbonated foam, nor is it served flat, increasing the amount of beer required to fill the glass. See our Savings Calculator for an idea of how much more beer you can serve per keg and how much additional profit you can make on draft beer by installing a DraftMore Automatic Regulator.



What Pressure Should My Regulator Be Set To When Using A DraftMore Automatic Regulator?


For a system below 40 degrees F, just set your primary regulator to about 25 psi and the DraftMore Automatic Regulator will do the rest. If you are using a DraftMore regulator with a mobile system where the beer will warm up throughout the day, set the pressure higher, up to 50 psi. Ensure you always use braided gas line for pressures above 35 psi, and make sure you always have at least one safety in the system (standard regulators have safeties, including all primary regulators; DraftMore regulators do not).



Do I Have To Use A Primary Or Secondary Regulator With DraftMore?


You must use a Primary Regulator to reduce the pressure to a level that is appropriate for standard or braided vinyl gas hoses. All draft systems should have safeties that release above 50 psi, so the primary regulator should bring the pressure below this threshold.

You do not need to use a secondary regulator with DraftMore, though you certainly can. If using a secondary regulator, just turn it up to around 25 psi for a refrigerated system with 100% CO2. Otherwise, just run the gas line to the DraftMore. You may also run the gas line to a gas distributor (with safety installed) and then run gas lines from the gas distributor to multiple DraftMore regulators. We have customers set up this way, so that DraftMore is the only secondary regulator in their system.

For more information on installing a DraftMore regulator, please see our Installation & Use page.



Can I Use A DraftMore Automatic Regulator In My Home Kegerator?


Of course! We have commercial customers who use DraftMore Automatic Regulators as the only secondary regulators in their systems. We also have home users who use a DraftMore Automatic Regulator to reduce or eliminate waste in their kegerators. They don’t worry about their regulator setting or their beer foaming, they just relax and enjoy perfectly carbonated beer.



Will A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With Beers Not Listed On Your Site?


We have several different DraftMore models; and one for nearly every type of beer. All the beers we know are listed on the site and updated regularly. Please try to find out the carbonation level of your beer by contacting the brewer before contacting us. In general, for 100% CO2 systems, most craft beers use a 3020 model, and most American lagers require a 3030 model. Most brewers don’t vary their carbonation levels much, so even an English-style ale from a craft brewer will generally have a carbonation level similar to the brewer’s other beers.



What Does an ‘Automatic Regulator’ Do?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator senses the beer temperature and pressure inside the keg. It opens automatically to provide more pressure on the beer when the beer temperature warms. Because it is always sensing the pressure inside the keg and the temperature, it is always providing the correct pressure for the beer type at any given temperature. The balance between the force of the head pressure in the keg pushing to keep the valve closed and the pressure of the bellows unit opening as needed ensures perfect carbonation at all times. This ensures that the DraftMore Automatic Regulator always provides the correct pressure, even if the carbonation level varies a little (as is often the case with craft brewery beers).



Can A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Be Used With A Gas Distributor (Air Bar)?


Yes. There are two ways to use a DraftMore regulator with a gas distributor. One way is to make the DraftMore regulator the only secondary regulator. Turn your primary regulator to about 30 psi and feed the output to a gas distributor. Then feed the hoses from the gas distributor to the DraftMore, which will correctly regulate the pressure.



Can I Use A DraftMore Automatic Regulator In My Home Kegerator?


Of course! We have commercial customers who use DraftMore Automatic Regulators as the only secondary regulators in their systems. We also have home users who use a DraftMore Automatic Regulator to reduce or eliminate waste in their kegerators. They don’t worry about their regulator setting or their beer foaming, they just relax and enjoy perfectly carbonated beer.

The other way, where gas distributors are part of the beer system, is to install the DraftMore and ensure the secondary regulator controlling the gas distributor is at least 2-3 psi over equilibrium pressure for the beer the DraftMore is installed on. This is not ideal, as the secondary regulator could be inaccurate and the DraftMore would still not have enough pressure to control the pressure as necessary. If different beer types (different carbonation levels) are on the same gas distributor, you can cause undercarbonation or overcarbonation on the other beers. Also, if you turn up the pressure, you can cause the other beers to flow too fast if the system restriction is not adequate. For these situations, please contact us, usually our Add A Gas Line Kit can help.



Do I Need A DraftMore Automatic Regulator For Every Keg Coupler?


Yes, you need a DraftMore Automatic Regulator for every coupler. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator attaches to the gas port of the coupler. This is important because the DraftMore regulator needs to sense the beer temperature and the head pressure at all times to provide accurate control.



Will A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Wear Out Or Become Less Accurate?


It will happen, but we don’t know when! We have had almost NO failures due to manufacturing defects in over 6 years of sales with over 20,000 units installed worldwide. DraftMore Automatic Regulators come with a 3 year warranty and are solidly constructed of all metal components. They are permanently sealed shut – there are no gaskets or fittings to wear out. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is a one-time investment that pays for itself many, many times over.



Where Are DraftMore Automatic Regulators Made?


DraftMore Automatic Regulators are made in Denmark with assistance from Danfoss A/S, a world leader in thermoregulating technology.



What Makes A DraftMore Automatic Regulator The Best Regulator For Beer Systems?


A DrafMore Automatic Regulator has several advantages over a standard regulator. It adjusts automatically, so that it is always providing the correct pressure on the beer. Because it is not manually adjustable, you (or the bartender, or cleaning personnel, etc.) can’t set it to the wrong pressure. It adjusts for temperature changes, so that it dramatically reduces foaming in situations where beer is in a cooler which is regularly accessed. It is highly accurate, more accurate than most standard regulators, ensuring the correct carbonation level is maintained. It is made of all metal components and permanently sealed – there are no rubber seals or diaphragms to wear out. And, it comes with a 30 day money back performance GUARANTEE and a 3 year full replacement warranty. We guarantee this is the best regulator you can buy for your beer system – and that it will pay for itself!



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Change My Beer?


A DraftMore AutoMatic Regulator ensures the carbonation level is always correct. This means your beer is never too flat or too foamy, but is served as the brewer intended. So, if your beer is brewed to have a rich, creamy head, a DraftMore regulator will ensure it does. If it is designed for a lighter head, like many ales, a DraftMore regulator ensures this is what you get.



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With A Cornelius Keg?


No, it does not. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator senses both headspace pressure and beer temperature through the keg coupler. Both are critical to the correct function of a DraftMore. In a Cornelius (Pepsi, and Coke) keg design, the gas port and the liquid port are separate.



What Would Happen if I Use A DraftMore Unit Other Than The One Recommended For My Beer?


You will cause foaming and waste, either from under or overcarbonation. It’s pretty easy to select the correct DraftMore Automatic Regulator. If you prefer beers from most major American brewers, use a DraftMore 3030 unit. If you prefer most American craft beers and European lagers, a DraftMore 3020 unit is best. Please see our Selection Guide for more information.



What Beers Will A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With?


Nearly all beers and beer types. The three basic models cover nearly all of the carbonation levels commonly found on the market, and we have specialty units for use with other beers, such as German Weisbier, that have exceptionally high carbonation levels. In general, our two most popular units are the 3030 (for use with American lagers and light beers) and the 3020 (for use with European lagers and most American craft beers, including ales, IPA’s, etc.) Please see our Selection Guide.



How Do the Benefits of Mixed Gas Systems Compare to the Benefits of DraftMore?


They really have different benefits. Mixed gas systems are really good at providing additional hydraulic pressure (via the nitrogen component of the gas) to push beer through beer lines over about 20 feet long. Additionally, the higher hydraulic pressure in a mixed gas system allows for about ½ - 1 psi additional flexibility in pressure settings and temperature fluctuations. Of course, if you serve beers (such as Guinness) that require a nitrogen blend to be served properly, a gas blender is required.

A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is designed to ensure the beer is always correctly carbonated, even when the temperature fluctuates by a few degrees. More importantly, a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is the most accurate regulator you can buy. Even with a mixed gas system, you still need accurate pressure regulation in order to maximize your keg yield and profitability. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator takes the guesswork out of setting your pressure, and keeps others from changing the pressure and screwing up your beer.

The most important thing to know is that DraftMore Automatic Regulators come with a performance guarantee – your beer will be better, or your money back. Serving properly carbonated beer is the best way to maximize draft beer profits and keg yields. Count on DraftMore to ensure your beer is always properly carbonated and to ensure you get maximum keg yield. Use a gas blender or beer pump to push beer through long lines.



Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Work With A TurboTap®?


Yes, a DraftMore Automatic Regulator works great with a TurboTap in a properly configured system! To get the most out of TurboTap’s Laminar Flow technology, you will have to change the system restriction to increase the flow. Combining a DraftMore Automatic Regulator and a TurboTap ensures perfect beer poured quickly every time without ever overcarbonating your beer.



How Do the Benefits of TurboTap® compare to the Benefits of DraftMore?


They really have different benefits. The most important thing to know is that DraftMore Automatic Regulators come with a performance guarantee – your beer will be better, or your money back. A TurboTap will help you pour beer faster while retaining a proper head, but it cannot fix problems with foamy or flat beer.



Because a mixed gas system is under more hydraulic pressure than a 100% CO2 system, mixed gas systems in general are about ½ - 1 psi more flexible than 100% CO2 systems when it comes to pressure settings or temperature fluctuations. However, mixed gas systems still require accurate regulation because the CO2 proportion of the mix must be maintained at its correct level, and if used in a system where there are temperature fluctuations, such as in a restaurant cooler where staff are frequently in the cooler, using a DraftMore regulator will give you correct pressure all the time.

We have a full line of DraftMore regulators designed to work with mixed gas systems. Please see our Selection Guide.



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Ensure Proper Carbonation For Draft Beer?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator attaches to the gas port on a keg coupler. It senses beer temperature via conduction, and it senses the headspace pressure in the keg. The headspace pressure pushes to keep the valve closed. The bellows unit responds to temperature and pushes to open the valve when the temperature increases, thereby increasing the pressure to keep the CO2 dissolved in the beer.

These two forces, the pressure from the headspace and the pressure from the bellows, balance each other constantly to ensure the CO2 level is correct. This ensures the pressure is always right for the keg, because the regulator is designed to mechanically provide pressure along a CO2 equilibrium curve, and it constantly measures the keg pressure to ensure it is correct. For more on CO2 equilibrium curve, please see ‘What is A CO2 Equilibrium Curve?’.



What Pressure Range Can A DraftMore Regulator Work With?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator can accept full bottle CO2 pressure (approximately 850 psi). It does not have a built-in safety, so it is important that you always use a safety when installing a DraftMore regulator.



Does Altitude Affect A DraftMore Automatic Regulator?


NO! Unlike all other secondary regulators, a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is NOT affected by altitude. This is because a DraftMore regulator becomes part of the coupler – the only environment it is exposed to is the headspace of the keg. All other regulator designs are ‘open’, meaning they are affected by changes in atmospheric pressure, just like a barometer. Even changes due to weather can affect the accuracy of a standard regulator.

One important note, however, is that elevation does affect how fast beer will flow. The speed of the beer flow is determined by the system restriction and the net pressure on the system – that is, the applied pressure less the atmospheric pressure. For every 2,000 foot gain in elevation, atmospheric pressure decreases by about 1 psi. So at 6,000 feet, the system restriction must be increased to compensate for the drop in atmospheric pressure. This means a kegerator at 6,000 feet will flow correctly with about 7 – 8 feet of restriction hose, whereas the same system would perform fine at sea level with 5 – 6 feet of restriction hose. Since you can’t turn down a DraftMore Automatic Regulator (and screw up your beer), you must change the restriction to affect beer flow. For more on this topic, see How Does Elevation Affect Regulator Settings and Beer Flow?.



I Am Interested In Selling DraftMore Automatic Regulators – Can I Be A Sales Rep?


We are looking for sales reps! Please see our Find Your Sales Rep page to apply to be a sales rep for DraftMore Automatic Regulators.



What Temperature Range Can A DraftMore Regulator Work With?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator follows the CO2 Equilibrium curve from 30 degrees F to 90 degrees F. It will provide the correct pressure to keep the CO2 at the correct level across the entire range of temperatures. Of course, your beer will flow much faster at higher temperatures because of the increased pressure needed to keep the CO2 in solution. Also, it is important to store keg beer between 36 and 38 degrees F to maintain freshness, even with pasteurized (generally imported) beer, unless you are using a jockey box and pouring the keg within a day or two.



How Can A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Improve the Quality and Keg Yield of Craft Beers?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is especially useful with craft brews. It is difficult to consistently achieve exactly the same carbonation level for every batch of beer, a challenge for many craft brewers. Because a DraftMore Automatic Regulator attaches directly to the coupler and constantly senses the headspace pressure, it can adapt to provide the correct pressure level, even for small differences between kegs. No other regulator can do that, which is why no other regulator has a Performance Guarantee to match DraftMore’s!



Can A DraftMore Regulator Be Used With A Jockey Box or Mobile Beer System?


Yes, we have many customers who use a DraftMore regulator with a jockey box system. This is similar to the type of set up a DraftMore regulator was invented for (European-style draft systems). We do recommend that the jockey box system has either a flow control faucet or a flow control adapter added to a standard faucet, as the pressure will increase as the beer warms in order to keep the beer from foaming.

Using a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is the best way to ensure that your backyard party or important event has draft beer well served, with a minimum of waste.



Why Were DraftMore Automatic Regulators Invented?


DraftMore regulators were invented to provide the correct pressure at all times, even when the temperature changes by several degrees over a short period of time. In most of Europe, Asia, Africa and South America, kegs are not refrigerated, so they are subject to changes in room temperature constantly (the beer is cooled as it is poured, as in a jockey box setup). When the temperature of the beer changes by more than 2 degrees F, the pressure required to keep the CO2 in solution changes by 1 psi, which only a DraftMore Automatic Regulator can do. Along the way, Gram Inventa A/S (the inventor and manufacturer of DraftMore) reinvented the regulator, resulting in the most accurate and only automatic regulator sold for beer systems.

Although it is true that refrigerated systems do not have the extreme temperature changes as a European-style system, coolers still operate within a deadband, all coolers are set slightly differently, regular secondary regulators are less accurate and have parts that can wear out over time, bartenders, line cleaners, etc. often change the pressure, and beer is often stored in a cooler with food in a restaurant, where staff frequently enter the cooler, causing the beer to constantly warm and cool.

A recent study in the US by a major brewer found that in over 700 accounts across several states, only 20 accounts (less than 3%) had the correct pressure for their beer system and temperature. These are commercial accounts regularly serviced by professionals. This is the problem a DraftMore Automatic Regulator solves – it always provides the correct pressure, reducing or eliminating foaming and waste!



What Problems Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Solve?


Although it is true that refrigerated systems do not have the extreme temperature changes as a European-style system, coolers still operate within a deadband, all coolers are set slightly differently, regular secondary regulators are less accurate and wear out over time, bartenders, line cleaners, etc. often change the pressure, and beer is often stored in a cooler with food in a restaurant, where staff frequently enter the cooler, causing the beer to warm.

A recent study by a major brewer found that in over 700 accounts across several states, only 20 accounts (less than 3%) had the correct pressure for their beer system and temperature. These are commercial accounts regularly serviced by professionals. This is the problem a DraftMore Automatic Regulator solves – it always provides the correct pressure, reducing or eliminating foaming and waste!



Where Are DraftMore Automatic Regulators Installed?


All over the world! DraftMore Automatic Regulators are installed in thousands of pubs owned by Carlsberg, one of Europe’s largest brewers; pubs owned by Stiegl, another European brewer, pubs owned by MicroMatic in Sweden, plus thousands of restaurants in bars across Asia and in the U.S. Please visit our select list of Satisfied Customers.



How Do I Find My DraftMore Sales Rep?


Please visit our Find Your Sales Rep page.



What If There Is No DraftMore Sales Rep In My Area?


You may purchase a DraftMore Automatic Regulator directly from DraftMore North America by clicking here. You can review our installation videos here, or download our Installation Guide. If necessary, we can assist you with the installation; you may contact us.



Can I Buy A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Directly From DraftMore North America?


Yes. DraftMore North America services all home users and commercial establishments where we do not currently have a sales rep. To order a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, please click here or on one of the Buy Now buttons on the site.

If you operate a commercial establishment, we will put you in touch with a sales rep in your area, who can evaluate your system, assist with selecting the correct units and even discuss payment plans. DraftMore regulators are sold at the same price whether purchased directly from DraftMore North America or through your rep. To find your sales rep, please see our ‘Find Your Sales Rep’ page.



Do I Need To Use The Check Valve (Thomas Valve) Included With DraftMore?


Yes, it is a high quality check valve which seals tightly, preventing cleaning chemicals from entering the DraftMore. A beer washer between the coupler and the DraftMore base is not required when using the check valve, but you can use one if you need to change the position of the gas input arm on the DraftMore. Always use a beer washer between the gas hose and the DraftMore gas input arm.



Can I Use A DraftMore Automatic Regulator With A Perlick Coupler?


Yes, please remove the Perlick coupler and use the check valve provided with DraftMore. A beer washer between the coupler and the DraftMore base is not required when using the check valve, but you can use one if you need to change the position of the gas input arm on the DraftMore. Always use a beer washer between the gas hose and the DraftMore gas input arm.



Which Coupler Types Will Fit DraftMore Automatic Regulators?


We stock DraftMore Automatic Regulators which fit all couplers with a standard US size gas port (5/8 outer thread size). If your coupler does not fit standard US beer nut sizes, please Contact Us to special order the correct size.



Do DraftMore Automatic Regulators Work With Guinness And Other Nitrogenated Beers?


Yes, we have a model that works perfectly with Guinness – when it is served with the correct gas blend. Guinness is meant to be served with a 75% Nitrogen / 25% CO2 gas blend. The blend must be correct, as both gases need to be kept in equilibrium. We recommend a McDantim gas blender to ensure you have the correct gas blend. We recommend a DraftMore Automatic Regulator to ensure your pressure is correct. You need to set your primary regulator to 40 psi to use the DraftMore model for Guinness. Ensure you have braided gas hose between your primary regulator and the DraftMore. Please see our Selection Guide to choose the correct DraftMore Automatic Regulator.



Will I Use More CO2 or Mixed Gas (Beer Gas) With A DraftMore Regulator?


No. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is very efficient, and only opens when more CO2 is needed. Otherwise, it stays shut to ensure the beer does not become overcarbonated. If anything, you will use less CO2 or mixed gas.



Can You Use A DraftMore Automatic Regulator With An FOB (Foam On Beer) Control?


Yes, the FOB has no effect on the function of DraftMore, and vice versa. We recommend FOB’s for long draw systems to help minimize foaming and waste during keg changeovers. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator helps minimize foaming and waste all the time.

If you would like to find out more about FOB’s, please click here.



How Does A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Differ From An FOB (Foam On Beer) Control?


An FOB controls foaming in a long draw system only during a keg change over. The FOB prevents the line from emptying when the keg does.

A DraftMore Automatic Regulator prevents foaming throughout the keg – it is working all of the time to ensure the pressure is correct and that the beer is correctly carbonated. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator complements an FOB, and in fact, we recommend FOB’s in all long draw systems.

If you would like to find out more about FOB’s, please click here.



What Is the Warranty On DraftMore Automatic Regulators?


DraftMore Automatic Regulators are designed for use in a commercial environment and are provided with a 3 year full replacement warranty. Because a DraftMore regulator is permanently sealed, it cannot be repaired if damaged or found to be defective. If a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is found to have a manufacturing defect during the warranty period, it will be replaced. Please see our full Warranty Policy.



What Is The DraftMore Performance Guarantee?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator will reduce foaming and ensure proper carbonation. This reduces or eliminates foaming and waste in a properly set up system. If, within 30 days you don’t agree you ‘Pour More, Better Beer’, please contact us to return your DraftMore Automatic Regulator for a full refund. Please see the full details of our Performance Guarantee.



Why Is My Beer Still Foamy?


A DraftMore Automatic Regulator cannot fix a keg that already has problems. It will not make them worse, but it will work best from the next new keg. You may want to review the Installation Guide to be sure you followed all the steps – leaving out a washer, for instance, can cause leaks which cause foaming.

Once you have installed a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, you can be sure your problem is not related to regulator pressure. Visit the topic ‘What Are Your General System Recommendations?’ to help you evaluate your other system components.



If you are using a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, you have the correct model for your beer, and your system temperature is below 40 degrees F, then you don’t have enough restriction in your system. We recommend and use MicroMatic beer line, and provide a new beer line with all direct sales. We calculate line length conservatively, using 1 foot = 2.2 pounds of resistance. This means that 5 feet of hose generally is not enough for beer served at 38 degrees.

Use the Beer Line Length Chart below to cut your line to the correct length prior to installing. If in doubt, try a longer length and remove line 4 inches at a time until you are satisfied with the beer speed. US draft systems are designed to pour beer at a rate of about 2 ounces/second, so your 16 ounce pours should take about 8 seconds. The lengths below are suggested for beer stored at 38 – 40 degrees F.

NOTE: For every 2 degrees below 38 degrees F you store your beer, remove 6” from the suggested lengths above. We do not recommend storing or serving beer below 36 degrees, as it detracts from the flavor of the beer. If you need something else for your draft system, MicroMatic sells high quality beer hoses, fittings and other beer system equipment.



Why Is My First Beer Foamy, Then The Next Pour Fine?


This happens when the beer in the line is not properly cooled. If the beer in the line is more than about 2 degrees F warmer than the keg, the CO2 will come out of solution and foam. Once you have foam, you have to stop - pouring beer on top of foam will just make foam. The best solution is to ensure your draft tower or faucet is properly cooled (with a quality blower kit) and insulated.

If you can’t really change this, a common trick is to open the faucet, wait until the stream is clear and then quickly put the glass under to ‘catch’ the beer stream. This will prevent a small amount of foam from ruining your pour.



Why Do I Get A Shot Of Foam In The Middle Of My Pour?


Foam in the middle of a pour indicates either a ‘hot spot’ somewhere in the beer line, usually due to inadequate insulation or lack of contact with the glycol lines, or it indicates undercarbonation, where bubbles caused by CO2 coming out of solution have collected at a high spot in the line, and move through the system. Undercarbonation can be caused by a regulator set too low or too much restriction in the system.

Undercarbonation can be fixed by using a DraftMore regulator in a properly set up system. Hot spots need to be chased down and fixed with insulation or adjustment of the cooling lines or airflow. For more on system setup, please see the topic ‘Where Can I Find Out More About Beer Systems?’



Why Is My New Keg Always Foamy?


One major reason a new keg is always foamy is because the system pressure is too low, and the beer is undercarbonated. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator can easily fix this, it will provide the correct pressure for the beer. You should also ensure your system is clean, your beer is fresh, your restriction is correct and your temperatures are good. Another reason could be that your keg is not allowed to cool enough before serving. Please see the topic ‘How Long Does A Keg Need To Cool Down?’



Why Does My Keg Foam Near The End Of The Keg?


The beer has been under too much pressure for the temperature and the type of beer. The overcarbonated beer starts at the top of the keg, but as the keg empties, the overcarbonated beer is all that is left in the keg, resulting in a lot of foam and waste. Using a DraftMore Automatic Regulator will ensure that the beer is correctly carbonated, reducing foaming and waste – guaranteed.



Why Does My Beer Foam When I Change Kegs (for Long Draw Systems)?


With a DraftMore Regulator in a system that is properly set up and maintained, there should be very little waste at keg changeover.

However, If you do not have an FOB installed in your long draw system, you will waste several beers at every keg changeover. Please go to MicroMatic now to purchase an FOB and stop wasting beer!



What Else Could Be Wrong?


Let’s run through the checklist again: 1) A DraftMore Automatic Regulator to ensure correct carbonation (of course!).
2) Fresh beer and a clean system with seals and components in good condition.
3) Keg temperature between 36 – 38 degrees F.
4) Good cooling all the way to the shank/tap connection.
5) System restriction set to provide a flow around 2 ounces per second.
6) ¼” fittings and shanks – do not use 3/16”. You can fit 3/16” hose over ¼” fittings by dipping the hose in hot water before assembly. If you need to purchase fittings, etc., visit MicroMatic.
7) A cold, wet ‘beer clean’ glass and good pouring technique. For a quick video of proper pouring technique, click here.



How Many Beers Are In A Keg?


Because a properly poured beer includes a head, there are more glasses of beer in a keg than just the sum of the liquid ounces (1,984). This figure only gives you how many totally flat beers (virtually no head) you could pour from a keg (about 120 16 ounce glasses). With a 1 inch head (which is about 25% beer) in a 16 ounce glass, your keg yield increases to 160 beers per keg – an increase of 30%!! Plus, the beer will be served properly, with a head, as the brewer intended. This is one of the main benefits of DraftMore – the beer will always be properly carbonated, you will always get the maximum amount of beer from a keg.

If you are interested in the impact of how this affects your profits, please use our Savings Calculator.



How Often Is Pressure Really A Problem?


A recent study by a major brewer found that in over 700 accounts across several US states, only 20 accounts (less than 3%) had the correct pressure for their beer system and temperature. These are commercial accounts regularly serviced by professionals. This is the problem a DraftMore Automatic Regulator solves – it always provides the correct pressure, reducing or eliminating foaming and waste!



How Do I Control My Beer Flow or Speed?


You don’t use the regulator - this will screw up your beer! Use a DraftMore Automatic Regulator to get the correct pressure for your system. Then adjust your restriction by adjusting your beer restriction line length or by adding a flow control device. Your beer should ideally flow around 2 ounces per second when stored between 36 – 38 degrees F. For more information, see the topic Why Is My Beer Flowing Too Fast?

If you need to order equipment, here are links for Beer Hoses, Flow Control Faucets, Flow Control Adapter (for standard faucets).



A well designed mixed gas system will do a great job of pushing beer through longer lines at higher pressures without overcarbonating the beer, and can provide multiple gas blends appropriate for several different types of beer. Because of the higher hydraulic pressures inherent in mixed gas systems, they also offer slightly more pressure and temperature flexibility than 100% CO2 systems. Unfortunately, some installers don’t seem to understand the correct pressure ranges for mixed gas systems. We have seen many systems which are operating at lower pressures than recommended for the gas blend, leading to undercarbonated beer.

At sea level , 38 degrees F, a 60% CO2 system should be operating at pressures around 30 - 33 psi for most lagers and ales. A 70% CO2 system should be operating at pressures around 24 - 26 psi. If a 60% CO2 system is set up to flow correctly (2 ounces per second) at 24 psi, the beer will be undercarbonated, and probably will be somewhat foamy for the first half of the keg. During the second half of the keg, the beer will be served with too little head, leading to reduced keg yields and profits, and non-optimal presentation (flat beer).

Using the correct DraftMore regulator for the gas blend ensures the pressure is correct, that the carbonation level is preserved, and that the pressure cannot be adjusted incorrectly by bar staff, line cleaners, etc.

We like mixed gas systems and think they are great for moving beer through long lines while preserving the correct carbonation ratio – when the system is designed and installed properly. We also prefer gas blenders to bottled mix gas, as we know the consistency of the blend from a gas blender is extremely accurate. Testing of bottled mixed gas has shown that the blend can be inconsistent, leading to pouring problems. In fact, some common ratios of CO2 and Nitrogen cannot be properly blended in a single bottle. You are almost always better off using a gas blender if you need mixed gas.

For more information on gas blenders and mixed gas, please visit McDantim, the premier manufacturer of gas blenders.



What Is A Beer’s Carbonation Level?


The carbonation level is a number used to describe how carbonated a beer is. Higher numbers equal higher carbonation. A 2.8 beer is fairly highly carbonated (some American lagers) whereas a 2.3 beer is much less carbonated (some English ales, porters, etc.). The carbonation level is set by the brewer and is designed to complement the beer by the amount and type of head, the mouthfeel of the bubbles and by the acidic taste of the carbonic acid.

The carbonation level describes the ratio of CO2 dissolved in the beer versus to the volume of beer. So, a beer with a 2.7 carbonation level means there is 2.7 times the volume of CO2 dissolved in the beer as there is beer.

The goal of a regulator is to keep the pressure applied on the beer correct for the beer type and temperature of the beer. Correct pressure ensures that the amount of CO2 dissolved in the beer inside the keg and the CO2 headspace remains the same as when the beer was kegged. Too much pressure at a given temperature forces more CO2 to dissolve in the beer, causing foamy, overcarbonated beer. Too little CO2 pressure causes undercarbonation, first foamy, then ultimately flat beer.

The pressure required to keep a 2.3 beer perfectly carbonated in a 100% CO2 system at sea level, 38 degrees F is 9.5 psi. A 2.8 beer in the same system would need 14.5 psi. If your pressure is more than 1 psi from optimal at a given temperature, you will have some foaming issues, and you will not maximize your keg yield. This means you can’t have a good system where a 2.3 beer (or even a 2.5 beer) and a 2.7 or 2.8 beer use the same regulator to control the pressure – you will have foaming issues on one or both beers. Use DraftMore Automatic Regulators, which are self-adjusting for a broad range of temperatures and pressures, and are accurate to within 0.5 psi.



How Do I Adjust The Beer Flow If I Can’t Change the Regulator Setting?


You should never change the regulator setting to adjust the flow, as it will screw up your beer’s carbonation and cause foaming. Change the system restriction – add more hose to slow down the flow, cut off some hose to speed it up. In general, a 1 foot section of 3/16” inner diameter (‘choke’) hose will give about 2.2 pounds of restriction value if you use Micromatic beer hose. If you are removing hose to increase flow, remove 6 inches (equivalent to 1 pound resistance) at a time. Please also refer to the topic How Does Elevation Affect Regulator Settings and Beer Flow?

Kegerator systems only need 3/16” hose, not a larger diameter hose (although all fittings, tailpieces and your shank should be ¼” diameter). To put 3/16” hose over a ¼” barb, simply dip the hose in near-boiling water for about 10 seconds before assembling.

You should only have to set up your restriction once. If you need to purchase beer hoses, fittings or other beer system equipment, please visit MicroMatic.



The pressure required to keep CO2 in solution at elevations above 2,000 feet is exactly the same as the pressure required to keep CO2 in solution at sea level. The beer will always follow the CO2 Equilibrium Curve for temperature and pressure. HOWEVER, elevation affects a standard regulator because the regulator diaphragm is ‘open’ to the external environment, and is thus affected by the drop in atmospheric pressure. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is ‘closed’ meaning the only environment which affects the regulator diaphragm is the keg headspace.

What is important is the difference between applied pressure and the atmospheric pressure. At sea level, atmospheric pressure is about 14.7 psi. For every 2,000 feet above elevation, the atmospheric pressure decreases by about 1 psi. So at 6,000 feet elevation, when the pressure applied to the beer is, for example 14 psi (equilibrium pressure for a 2.7 carb beer at 38 degrees F), the difference between the applied pressure and the atmospheric pressure surrounding the faucet is 3psi less than at sea level, and the beer will flow faster..

We have worked extensively with pressure, carbonation and resistance above 6,000 feet of elevation, and have developed the following Beer Hose Length Quick Reference Chart to use when sizing beer line:

Most kegerators are delivered with a standard beer hose (3/16” internal diameter; ‘choke hose’) length of 5 feet (equal to 15 pounds of resistance, add about 2 pounds of resistance for the tower elevation and fittings), which is usually fine for most beers at sea level. Our chart starts with a recommendation of about 6 feet because it allows a slightly more forgiving system for a wider range of beer types and allows some room for adjustment. You can always remove some hose, 4 inches at a time if your beer flow is too slow.

If you need to order beer hose, click here. If you want to add additional control to your system, purchase a flow control faucet or a flow control adapter. With the flow controls, you can leave your beer line shorter and use the flow control for adjustment.



How Do You Get A Perfect Draft Beer Pour Every Time?


Easy. Start with a DraftMore Automatic Regulator to ensure your beer is always properly carbonated. Make sure your temperatures are correct and consistent, ideally between 36 – 38 degrees. Clean lines and equipment, and a cold (not frozen), wet beer clean glass will ensure your head retention is good and that there are no off flavors affecting your beer. Proper technique is important – flick the faucet open quickly, and don’t let the faucet touch the glass (see instructional guide here). Make sure your restriction is correct, so that the beer flows about 2 ounces per second. Enjoy!



What If I Like My Draft Beer Warmer Than 38 Degrees F?


We recommend keeping your beer stored at 38 – 40 degrees, and warming the glass slightly before pouring. This can be a preferred way of serving European beers and many styles of ale. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator will ensure the pressure is correct for the temperature, but you may have to add restriction or flow control because the beer will flow faster at warmer temperatures due to the increased pressure.

European beers served at warmer temperatures are typically poured at a speed of less than 1 ounce per second to help reduce foaming, whereas most US systems are designed to flow around 2 ounces per second. A flow control adapter can be purchased at MicroMatic for about $35, well worth it if you want to add flexibility to your system when serving different beer styles at different temperatures.



What If I Like My Draft Beer Colder than 36 Degrees F (or even below 32 degrees)?


Many American consumers prefer American lagers served very cold. DraftMore works great in supercold systems and will provide the correct pressure and the appropriate head for beer stored cold, even below 32 degrees F. However, storing or serving your beer this cold will lead to less head on the beer because more CO2 is dissolved in the beer. You will reduce your keg yield as many as 20 beers per keg simply by keeping the temperature at 32 degrees instead of 38. Also, colder beer has less taste and aroma, and with more CO2 dissolved in the beer, it causes more gas and bloating once consumed.



What is Draft System Balance?


Draft system balance is the balance between pressure applied and the system restriction. A system is ‘balanced’ when the pressure applied keeps the beer correctly carbonated (ensured by using a DraftMore Automatic Regulator) and the restriction provides a beer flow of 1.5 – 2 ounces per second. Because the DraftMore Automatic Regulator ensures the pressure is set correctly, you just need to worry about your temperature and your restriction. For more on system setup, visit MicroMatic’s Draft Beer Institute.



1) A DraftMore Automatic Regulator to ensure correct carbonation (of course!).
2) Fresh beer and a clean system with seals and components in good condition.
3) Keg temperature between 36 – 38 degrees F.
4) Good cooling all the way to the shank/tap connection.
5) System restriction set to provide a flow between 1.5 – 2 ounces per second.
6) ¼” fittings and shanks – do not use 3/16”. You can fit 3/16” hose over ¼” fittings by dipping the hose in hot water before assembly. If you need to purchase fittings, etc., visit MicroMatic.
7) A cold, wet ‘beer clean’ glass and good pouring technique. For a quick video of proper pouring technique, click here.



It takes four times as long to cool a keg down as it does to warm up. A keg will warm up a few degrees F in just a couple of hours if left out, and will need to cool off for 12 or more hours to get back down to 36 – 38 degrees.

A DraftMore Automatic Regulator can help you start pouring beer sooner, as it will adjust to provide more pressure on the warmer beer. As the beer cools, it will provide the correct pressure to ensure your beer is always properly carbonated. See our Kegerator Setup Tips for more information on how to get the maximum benefit from using a DraftMore in a kegerator system.



How Fast Does A Keg Warm Up?


Faster than you might think. If the temperature is not properly maintained, or if the keg is left out of the refrigerator for a few hours, it will warm up several degrees. It takes four times as long to cool a keg down as it does to warm it up, so a keg that has been left out for 3 – 4 hours and warmed a few degrees may require 12 or more hours to cool back down to 36 – 38 degrees.



A DraftMore Automatic Regulator can help with this – it will adjust to provide the correct pressure for the beer flow. Using a DraftMore regulator with a flow control faucet or a flow control adapter allows you to start serving beer before it’s as cold as the rest of your system, giving you less down time. For more information on setting up your draft system this way, please see our Kegerator Setup Tips.



How Does Temperature Affect Pressure In A Draft Beer System?


At higher temperatures, more pressure is required to keep CO2 dissolved in the beer. At lower temperatures, less pressure is required. The relationship is linear and close – a 2 degree change in temperature requires changing the pressure by 1 psi to keep the CO2 at the correct level. Getting the pressure correct is key to serving properly carbonated beer – this is one of the main advantages of DraftMore Automatic Regulators.



How Do I Measure The Temperature Of My Beer or Kegerator?


The best way is to use a spirit thermometer in a glass of water stored in the cooler or kegerator (liquid temperature differs from ambient temperature – you need to measure liquid temperature). A not-bad way is to use a quick-read immersion thermometer and test the second or third beer poured from a kegerator. This does not work for long draw systems because the glycol cooling will affect the temperature of the beer. In a long draw system what you should look at is whether the beer at the tap is as cold or colder than the beer in the cooler.



Do I Need A Longer Beer Line (More Restriction)?


If your beer is flowing too fast, you might. Restriction is used to control beer flow. In most US systems, the length of the beer hose determines the beer speed. The regulator should never be adjusted to slow down or speed up the beer – the regulator pressure needs to be set to maintain the carbonation level and temperature of the beer.

With a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, the pressure is always correct, and cannot be adjusted. So, you need to have the correct restriction by adjusting the length of the beer hose so that the beer speed is between 1.5 – 2 ounces per second. For more on system setup, please see ‘What Are Your General System Recommendations?’ [click goes to this topic]



Do I Need To Worry About The Accuracy Of My Other Primary Or Secondary Regulator?


When you install a DraftMore Automatic Regulator, you don’t need to worry any more about the accuracy of your other regulator. Just set it well above the pressure required for the system, around 25 psi for a standard set up, and DraftMore will take over to ensure the correct pressure.



Do I Need To Test My System Pressure Once A DraftMore Automatic Regulator Is Installed?


No, you can be assured that a DraftMore Automatic Regulator is always providing the correct pressure. It is a highly accurate design that will automatically adjust for beer temperature and for small variations in beer carbonation level.



How Fast Should My Beer Flow?


For a standard US faucet and system set up between 36 – 38 degrees F, the beer should flow between 1.5 – 2 ounces per second. Slower -flow affects presentation and makes it difficult to build a good head. Faster flow can be a problem if you do not have the correct amount of restriction, as beer flowing too fast will have CO2 breakout problems and will foam. If your beer is flowing faster than this, please see the topic, ‘How Do I Add Restriction To My System?’



There are two main ways to add restriction. The first is to increase the length of choke line (3/16 internal diameter) in the system. At sea level, 1 foot of 3/16 line adds about 3 pounds of restriction. If your system is more than about 3,000 feet above sea level, see ‘How Does Elevation Affect Beer Line Length?’. We recommend beer line from MicroMatic.

The other easy way to add restriction is to install a flow control faucet or add a flow control adapter to your existing faucet. Either way is a simple solution which gives you more control over your system.



Where Can I Buy Hoses, Washers, Fittings, Couplers, Faucets, etc.?


We trust products from MicroMatic. Click the following links to take you to the correct page:
1) Beer and Gas Hoses
2) Fittings And Washers
3) Couplers
4) Faucets
5) Flow Control Adapter


Perlick has also recently added an online shop; we like Perlick couplers and faucets also.



How Can I Tell If My Pressure Is Too Low?


Your beer will foam mostly at the beginning of the keg, with the latter half being flat. You may also periodically have foam during a pour, the result of bubbles in the line where the CO2 has come out of solution because the pressure is too low. If you tap on the line near the keg, you should see bubbles come through the line, or you can check a high spot, this is where the bubbles will collect. Turn up your regulator, or better yet, buy a DraftMore Automatic Regulator and quit worrying about pressure!



How Can I Tell If My Pressure Is Too High?


Your beer will foam during the latter half of the keg, and the pour speed may be too quick. Turn down your regulator, or better yet, buy a DraftMore Automatic Regulator and quit worrying about pressure!



What Is CO2 Equilibrium?


CO2 is dissolved in the beer, and also fills the headspace as gas above the beer. Beer is consumed from the bottom of the keg, so as the beer volume drops, CO2 is added to the headspace to keep the same pressure on the beer.

The CO2 inside a keg is always moving, entering and leaving the beer. When the same amount of CO2 is entering the beer as is leaving the beer, you have equilibrium. If, at a given temperature the pressure is too high, more CO2 will enter the beer than leave it, causing the carbonation level to increase until a new equilibrium is reached. This will cause overcarbonation and foaming. Depending on the temperature and the amount of pressure applied, overcarbonation can happen quite quickly, even within a matter of hours.

If not enough pressure is applied for the temperature and the beer, the CO2 will come out of solution too fast, causing foaming, and leaving behind flat beer.

A keg is delivered from the brewery correctly carbonated by the brewer. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator ensures it remains at equilibrium, even if the temperature increases, causing the CO2 to leave the beer faster, thus requiring more pressure. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator only adds pressure as it is needed, and stays closed unless more pressure is required.

To see an example of an equilibrium chart, please click here.



What Causes Foamy Beer?


Incorrect pressure is one of the main causes of foaming. A recent study by a major brewer showed that most bars and restaurants are not using the correct pressure for their beer systems – and their systems are designed, built and maintained by draft beer professionals.

The next main causes of foaming are temperature fluctuations. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator can help with temperature fluctuations in the cooler, but system issues also include problems with hot spots in the lines and improperly cooled towers. Finally, glassware that is too warm (such as straight from the glass washer) can also be a problem.

Unclean systems and glassware are another common cause – not only can these cause foaming, but can lead to off flavors and odors affecting a customer’s enjoyment of their beer as well.



Several factors can affect head retention. System cleanliness and glass cleanliness are the most important factors. It is recommended that you do not clean your beer glasses with your other dishes, and do not use dishwasher soaps which contain petroleum by-products.

For more information on how to check your glass to ensure it’s beer clean, please click here to view the relevant information and helpful pictures from the Brewer’s Association Draught Beer Quality Guide.



There are several great resources available on the internet, but two that are easy to access and understand are the online MicroMatic’s Draft Beer Institute and the Brewer’s Association Draught Beer Quality Guide. If you want to learn more about beer gas or mixed gas, proper carbonation, partial pressure and CO2 levels, visit McDantim’s Online School of Gas Blending.



My Beer System is At 7,000 Feet of Elevation. Can I Use 100% CO2, or Do I Need A Gas Blend With Less CO2?


We have many customers with systems located at ski resorts and at altitudes around 7,000 feet. Several customers have 100% CO2 systems, which work perfectly with a DraftMore Automatic Regulator. If you are considering using a gas blend and your system is located at 5,000 feet of elevation or above, you should actually consider using a gas blend richer in CO2, like a 70% CO2 blend. This is because these systems run at lower pressures than 60% CO2 systems, which helps compensate for the lower atmospheric pressure and the greater difference between the applied pressure and the atmospheric pressure.

For more information, please see How Does Elevation Affect Regulator Settings and Beer Flow?



How Long Will A Beer in a Keg Stay Fresh?


Most keg beer made in America is not pasteurized, so the flavor starts to degrade almost immediately after kegging. The beer is best preserved when stored between 36 and 38 degrees, and will taste best within 45 days of kegging (so check your keg before you buy it to see when it was produced). Nearly all import kegs are pasteurized, so their flavor lasts longer, but 60 days is about the limit for these beers. Beer is meant to be drunk, not saved!

One of the reasons many people prefer draft beer is the freshness and the quality, some of which can get lost when beer is pasteurized, such as when it is bottled or canned (an exception is Coors; there are other brewers which do not pasteurize their packaged beer either).



A beer clean glass is one which does not have any residue in it. This includes residues from soaps or cleaning chemicals, which can affect taste, smell and head retention. A beer clean glass will allow a proper head to form and retain throughout consumption, noticeable by visible ‘lacing’ of the glass as the beer is consumed.

Most dishwasher detergents are made from petroleum compounds, which leave a residue that will affect head retention and lead to off flavors. Also, washing your beer glasses with your other dishes will result in some residue on your glasses. You can buy special detergents for cleaning glassware from MicroMatic.

Three easy tests can help you determine if you are getting your glasses beer clean (besides seeing if they smell funny): the sheeting test (water should sheet evenly off the inside of the glass), the salt test (salt should adhere evenly to the inside of the glass) and the lacing test (the head should lace the glass all the way to the bottom). For more on getting your glasses beer clean and for some pictures of these tests, please see the MicroMatic’s Draft Beer Institute and the Brewer’s Association Draught Beer Quality Guide.



A CO2 equilibrium curve graphs the relationship between the temperature of the beer and the pressure required to keep the CO2 dissolved in solution. It shows that the relationship is constant and linear. Each carbonation level (2.4, 2.7, etc.) has its own curve to follow. A DraftMore Automatic Regulator is designed to follow the equilibrium curve to always provide the correct pressure at any given temperature – thus keeping the beer perfectly carbonated.

The chart demonstrates how accurate a regulator setting needs to be, and shows the importance of the accuracy of a DraftMore Automatic Regulator. For an example of a CO2 Equilibrium chart, please click here.